Jefferson County Public School

‘Ban conversion therapy Kentucky’ Executive Director’s call to action

For me the word queer is liberating. Growing up in Southern Indiana, where there was minimal support for LGBTQ people, I didn’t know what supportive LGBTQ spaces looked like.

Moving to Louisville, Kentucky, I started coming into my queer identity and learning how my other identities influence the way I exist in various spaces. For myself, the queer community has given me purpose.

Being involved in activism and fighting for the queer community is a passion of mine.

I am heading a project to make conversion therapy illegal for minors in Kentucky. Hearing the horror stories from survivors of conversion therapy, we wanted to take action to show queer kids that someone is fighting for them. No one should have to experience this torture and should be able to be happy and celebrate who they are.

Though we have made significant strides as a community in the United States– our fight is far from over. In addition to the work we have ahead of us as a country, we as community have so much work to do.

I believe that Queer people and all people will never truly experience liberation until we as a community actively address the oppression that still exists in queer spaces.

We will not truly be a community until we fully support queer folks who are black and brown, undocumented queer folks, our queer folks with disabilities, queer folks of all body types, as well as many other identities that intersect with queerness.

I am excited for the progress that will come with future generations — it seems that today’s youth are more caring and unapologetic in their queer identities than ever before.

#unstoppable

Queer Kentucky sent two youth mentors from the Louisville, Kentucky community to the Baptiste Foundation’s #unstoppable program.

This is a training for anyone who works with youth – school teachers, school counselors, aides, coaches, community center employees, police officers, etc. Our participants learned through personal experience, a set of tools to teach basic yoga poses, breathing, meditation and relaxation techniques to youth as a part of how they already work with them. The training will also gave an introduction as to why and how these tools can help people who have experienced trauma. Our participants were given valuable tools that taught them how to care for themselves first so they can more effectively serve others.

Jefferson County Public School teacher Trina Helson works as the adviser to the LGBTQ+/alliance student group at Eastern High School and participated in the training. Also, Chris Wilson, diversity and outreach coordinator for Louisville Youth Group attended. Both participants filled out an application through Queer Kentucky and were selected based on their interaction with LGBTQ+ youth.

This training covered how yoga, meditation and self inquiry are powerful tools for self care, but also through personal experience, how it can be shared with others.

We thank 502 Power Yoga and the Baptiste Foundation for offering an inclusive space for education and self-growth.

*The Baptiste Foundation is a 501c3 non-profit organization contributing to individuals and communities in need by sharing the powerful tools and techniques of Baptiste Yoga. The Baptiste Foundation exists to bring yoga and educational programs to empower and inspire communities across the planet.
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